OK – Still part of #CPD23 catch-up, this time referencing software. It’s just going to be a quick glimpse at each piece of software and my approach.

Being of a certain age, when I did my original degree, there was not any referencing software or more accurately none that I was aware of. If I am being honest e-journals, at Bolton institute as it was known then, were really just in their infancy in comparison to today. Damn kids don’t know how lucky etc. etc. This however, is no excuse for continuing my own approach (printing off each reference, numbering it and then liberally spreading them throughout the house much to the delight of Future Mrs Cook) to reference management though my masters as well as my professional life. I am just happy in my routine. Not the most forwarding thinking approach I am sure you will agree! Since attention has turned to my dissertation I have begun to use Endnote but not at all to its full potential – really just as an organiser for both dissertation and professional papers of interest. Due to a cost implication I do not use Endnote at work, just at home. I thought I would glance at Endnote as well as ‘Cite U Like’ despite its ‘txtspk’ title.

A plus to ‘Cite U Like’ straightway is the fact that as well as being free at a basic level, being an online resource – it is a lot more accessible than Endnote – pretty much accessible anywhere, always a plus in my opinion. A negative, especially from a work perspective is the fact that whilst registering within the ‘subjects allied to medicine’, nonsense like acupuncture and other ‘complementary’ medicines are available as subjects but public health or even primary care as a generality is not? The closest I got was ‘medicine and dentistry’>’pre-clinical medicine’. This happens again in ‘research areas’. Whilst I could and probably will use it as a personal professional tool, I would not use it as a ‘work resource’ unless it got more specific within my particular field. I am not well enough up on other specialities to see whether that is an issue in other library fields, I could imagine academic/subject librarians finding it of some use – building lists for each area they cover perhaps. When messing around with ‘Cite U Like’ a thought did occur though – can it be used with other pieces of software – in particular Evernote and Endnote? It can to a point with Evernote, but due its accessibility I’m not sure after playing around with it, that this is particular useful or necessary. You can import and export with Endnote however, which is very useful. Because I do not have access to Endnote whilst at work, I could use ‘Cite U Like’ as a temporary and portable reference manager negating need to email links/searches home and the such. There is also scope for it to be used not as a public-facing library resource but a support mechanism, though this requires some further thought. I tried a search on LISTA just to check as to whether or not both reference managers work with it, and they do – perfectly fine. You can even transfer from LISTA to one to the other piece of software. This also works on HDAS.

Upon reflection – Thing 14 has enabled me to realise that I am still quite Neolithic when it comes to reference management, and that being more progressive with this, will help me develop professionally. I like to judge resources by thinking about how the resource could of possibly benefited me in the past, and the combination of these could of every time I have gone ‘what was that document called’ or ‘where is the article by x’ which happens more than I would like to admit! Both of these resources I am going to use more, especially with my non-employed professional work as even with a Mendeley for example I would not be able to download for work purposes. I need to work on how to fully integrate Endnote before I start my dissertation properly.

 

 

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