Learning Log 111 – ‘Find out about Fellowship’ Webinar

Date: 16th November 2018

Number:  111

Significant Experience: Watched the CILIP Webinar ‘Find out about Fellowship’

What Happened?

So What? This was important as I have let Fellowship drift and these past few months, where I have been focussed on larger professional and personal issues, lost grip of Fellowship – thinking more about if I should continue (having started in Spring 2017) which has taken my thoughts away from why I wanted to do Fellowship in the first place. This webinar has helped refocus my motivations behind it and demystify aspects of Fellowship I had allowed to cloud my overall thinking behind it. I now have a clearer picture of what is expected of me and how I can achieve it (or fail to – which is just as valid outcome).

Now What? With this renewed focus and energy I am going to re-examine and analyse the work I have done so far, to see where my restart point is as there is a lot of half started work that needs to be looked at. I have the overall goal of submitting by June 2019, and I shall have a completion road map by January 8th 2019 to enable this.

When & Where: Webinar, 14 -16th November

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#Reading365 – Putting research in place: an innovative approach to providing contextualized evidence synthesis for decision makers

What is it?

Bornstein, S., Baker, R., Navarro, P., Mackey, S., Speed, D., & Sullivan, M. (2017). Putting research in place: an innovative approach to providing contextualized evidence synthesis for decision makers. Systematic reviews, 6(1), 218.

What’s it about?

A look at the The Contextualized Health Research Synthesis Program (CHRSP), based in (rural areas of) Canada that has been producing knowledge and evidence synthesis to support practice on topics chosen by the health system since 2007. The research breaks down the approach, successes and challenges that they have encountered.

So what?

Although this approach may not be perfectly compatible due to geographic and system differences, this approach is potentially modifiable to support any health and care system. The direct involvement of the health system in deciding the synthesis topics  (in fact getting the system to horizon scan the issues to them to produce a forward plan) is such a simple yet effective approach that removes the often reactive nature of evidence requests that increase time pressures and impact quality. This ‘joint ownership’ approach also seems to tackle the question of senior buy-in! Both this and the ‘rapid evidence review’ products seem to be excellent concepts that meet the needs of users and could be potentially adapted to meet the needs of other groups (i.e. local public health…)

#Reading365 – A systematic approach to searching: an efficient and complete method to develop literature searches

What is it?

Bramer, W. M., de Jonge, G. B., Rethlefsen, M. L., Mast, F., & Kleijnen, J. (2018). A systematic approach to searching: an efficient and complete method to develop literature searches. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA106(4), 531.

What’s it about?

It is a checklist (and detailed process) created by the authors for having a systematic approach to literature searching

So what?

For a seasoned searcher whose own technique is full of bad habits and unexplained shortcuts, a resource like this is a nice refresher on ‘clean’ searching with some handy tips for trying new approaches. For a new searcher it provides a fantastic process for developing effective searches to gain confidence and skill simultaneously.  This is an area which is covered increasingly well (I would recommend looking into Andrew Booth’s work on this) and this is a useful and easily understandable addition!

Learning Log 110 – Altmetrics Webinar

Date: 14/11/2018

Number: 110

Significant Experience: I attended the ‘Altmetrics: How you can explore beyond the numbers to find useful insights’ Webinar, hosted by CILIP and presented by Andy Tattersall

What Happened? The hour long webinar was an introduction and overview to altmetrics, covering the fundamentals of them, looking at the reasons for and critiques against and also examining the market leaders in providing them.

So What? This was a positive learning experience as, over the summer, I had worked on piece of working examining wider metrics for my host organisation and it was useful to receive some fundamentals on how altmetrics came to be and how useful they can be in terms of measuring impact – as well as some of the issues surrounding them. The problem we faced in the summer – how to track the impact of unpublished work in the wider public health environment – still remains, but it further strengthens the argument as to why output should be published though traditional methods and not treated like internal documents

Now What? I am going to condense this learning and feedback to my project partner, enabling them strengthen the case for proper publication standards which, if taken forward, would enable the organisation to properly measure the impact across traditional and alternative metrics and show the true value of their output as a government body.

When & Where: Online, 13th November 2018

#Reading365 – Finding the Integrated Care Evidence Base in PubMed and Beyond: A Bibliometric Study of the Challenges.

What is it?

Lewis, S., Damarell, R. A., Tieman, J. J., & Trenerry, C. (2018). Finding the Integrated Care Evidence Base in PubMed and Beyond: A Bibliometric Study of the Challenges. International journal of integrated care, 18(3).

What’s it about?

A bibliometric analysis of six databases focusing on integrated care relevant research and the relevance of MESH terms to integrated care research

So what?

This research does not hold any surprises to those already versed in trying integrated care (or local public health/social care commissioning) searching/supporting practice! It highlights the challenges faced given that integrated care – and a lot of the terminology around it is yet to be established within the databases and the terminology/keywords used within the research often lacks consistency. This research does offer useful guidance on searching but the unspoken question remains of how much integrated care excellence never reaches traditional research and remains hidden within internal documents and remains knowledge untranslated… Perhaps there is an opportunity to not only develop resources to support high quality expert searching within integrated care but also on how to shine a light on best integrated care practice?

#Reading365 -Factors influencing application of behavioural science evidence by public health decision-makers and practitioners, and implications for practice.

What is it?

Curtis, K., Fulton, E., & Brown, K. (2018). Factors influencing application of behavioural science evidence by public health decision-makers and practitioners, and implications for practice. Preventive medicine reports, 12, 106-115.

What’s it about?

It’s a small scale qualitative study that examines why public health decision makers and practitioners don’t use/value behavioural science evidence. The case studies, based around teams in the midlands examine the reasons for this are and what the possible implications are.

So what?

Although very small, it does build upon the evidence of ‘what life is like’ for Public Health in Local Authorities especially in terms of evidence (local is best), but from both a commissioning and provider/practitioner point of view which is quite unique. It also offers examples of how evidence could be supplanted into an established commissioning framework rather than trying (and failing!) to change it to include evidence and shows opportunity for ‘knowledge mobilisation’ in public health practice.

 

#Reading365 – The medline UK filter: development and validation of a geographic search filter to retrieve research about the UK from OVID

(an easy one for a Saturday!)

What is it?

Ayiku, L., Levay, P., Hudson, T., Craven, J., Barrett, E., Finnegan, A., & Adams, R. (2017). The medline UK filter: development and validation of a geographic search filter to retrieve research about the UK from OVID medline. Health Information & Libraries Journal34(3), 200-216.

What’s it about?

The creation and development of a UK geographic filter to support literature searching.

So what?

This is an essential tool for literature searching – a pre-saved strategy when looking at UK only results. There is a HDAS friendly version out there somewhere!